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Photo Friday

Each Friday, the Ransom Center shares photos from throughout the week that highlight a range of activities and collection holdings. We hope you enjoy these photos that reveal some of the everyday happenings at the Center.

Cameras on display in the exhibition ‘Discovering the Language of Photography: The Gernsheim Collection.’  Shown here are cameras ranging in date from 1886 to 1925, including the first Kodak camera and a circular nineteenth-century detective camera that was used while being concealed under a jacket or vest. Photo by Anthony Maddaloni.
Cameras on display in the exhibition ‘Discovering the Language of Photography: The Gernsheim Collection.’ Shown here are cameras ranging in date from 1886 to 1925, including the first Kodak camera and a circular nineteenth-century detective camera that was used while being concealed under a jacket or vest. Photo by Anthony Maddaloni.
Currently on display, this portable folding camera obscura, ca. 1750, can be disassembled and stored in the box that serves as its base. The periscope, which comes with separate lenses for distant and near subjects, contains a mirror that reflects the light at a 45-degree angle onto the floor of the base. This projected image may be viewed through a large aperture on the side, and an artist could reach inside through a cloth sleeve to trace the projected image onto a sheet of paper. Photo by Anthony Maddaloni.
Currently on display, this portable folding camera obscura, ca. 1750, can be disassembled and stored in the box that serves as its base. The periscope, which comes with separate lenses for distant and near subjects, contains a mirror that reflects the light at a 45-degree angle onto the floor of the base. This projected image may be viewed through a large aperture on the side, and an artist could reach inside through a cloth sleeve to trace the projected image onto a sheet of paper. Photo by Anthony Maddaloni.
Hal Erickson, a University of Utah Health Sciences Center researcher, visited the Ransom Center to apply nondestructive forensic techniques for recovering faded, erased, redacted, obscured or otherwise lost content.  Here, Erickson is photographing a passage that was redacted, and then further obscured with adhered paper bearing replacement text, by Thomas Hammond in a manuscript volume of his ‘Memoirs.’  Photo by Anthony Maddaloni.
Hal Erickson, a University of Utah Health Sciences Center researcher, visited the Ransom Center to apply nondestructive forensic techniques for recovering faded, erased, redacted, obscured or otherwise lost content. Here, Erickson is photographing a passage that was redacted, and then further obscured with adhered paper bearing replacement text, by Thomas Hammond in a manuscript volume of his ‘Memoirs.’ Photo by Anthony Maddaloni.

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