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New websites for the Gutenberg Bible and the First Photograph

Page from new First Photograph web exhibition.
Page from new First Photograph web exhibition.

The Ransom Center launched updated websites for its two permanent exhibitions, the Gutenberg Bible and the First Photograph. The websites contain information, interactive components, and content geared toward children related to each exhibition.

The Gutenberg Bible is the first substantial book printed from movable type on a printing press. It was printed in Johann Gutenberg’s shop in Mainz, Germany, between 1450 and 1455. View a video demonstrating Gutenberg’s printing process.

Gutenberg’s invention revolutionized the distribution of knowledge by making it possible to produce many accurate copies of a single work in a relatively short amount of time. View a map that shows the spread of printing after Gutenberg.

Visitors can turn the pages of the Gutenberg Bible, view the pages in high-resolution, and browse by Books of the Bible or page characteristics, including famous passages, illuminations, and watermarks.

The Ransom Center holds one of five complete copies in the United States. View a map of where the other Gutenberg Bibles are housed.

The First Photograph, which Frenchman Joseph Nicéphore Niépce produced in 1826, is the foundation of the Ransom Center’s photography collection. The 8 x 6.5-inch heliograph depicts a view just outside the workroom window of Niépce’s estate in Le Gras in east central France.

Website visitors can watch an animated video showing how the First Photograph was made as well as create a virtual heliograph of themselves using a webcam; the virtual heliograph image replicates the photographic technique used to create the First Photograph.

The website offers content geared for younger visitors, including digital coloring pages of the Gutenberg Bible and First Photograph and the opportunity to use Gutenberg’s process to print their own message.

The website was made possible through a generous gift by Margaret Hight.

Photo Friday

Each Friday, the Ransom Center shares photos from throughout the week that highlight a range of activities and collection holdings. We hope you enjoy these photos that reveal some of the everyday happenings at the Center.

Guests gather in the south atrium during the “Face  To Face” opening event for “Arnold Newman: Masterclass.” Photo by Kelsey  Robinson.
Guests gather in the south atrium during the “Face To Face” opening event for “Arnold Newman: Masterclass.” Photo by Kelsey Robinson.
“Face To Face” guests visit the cupcake station during the event. Photo by Pete Smith.
“Face To Face” guests visit the cupcake station during the event. Photo by Pete Smith.
The photobooth at the “Face To Face” event recreated an Arnold Newman  photograph of Carl Sandburg and Marilyn Monroe. The Lomography Gallery Store  Austin shot the images on film. Photo by Lindsay  Hutchens.
The photobooth at the “Face To Face” event recreated an Arnold Newman photograph of Carl Sandburg and Marilyn Monroe. The Lomography Gallery Store Austin shot the images on film. Photo by Lindsay Hutchens.
Guests explore the exhibition “Arnold Newman: Masterclass” during the “Face To Face” opening event. Photo by Pete Smith.
Guests explore the exhibition “Arnold Newman: Masterclass” during the “Face To Face” opening event. Photo by Pete Smith.
"The Intertextual Sherlock Holmes," curated by graduate intern Arcadia  Falcone (shown here), is now on view outside the Reading  Room.  This display of rare books and periodicals features Sherlock  Holmes pastiches, parodies, and fanfictions from 1895 to 1975, including  works by Mark Twain, O. Henry, and John Lennon. Photo by Pete Smith.
"The Intertextual Sherlock Holmes," curated by graduate intern Arcadia Falcone (shown here), is now on view outside the Reading Room. This display of rare books and periodicals features Sherlock Holmes pastiches, parodies, and fanfictions from 1895 to 1975, including works by Mark Twain, O. Henry, and John Lennon. Photo by Pete Smith.

Robert De Niro’s “Silver Linings Playbook” costume ensemble on view

Robert De Niro received his seventh Academy Award® nomination for his supporting role in Silver Linings Playbook (2012). The Ransom Center holds De Niro’s collection of papers and costumes and props, which includes materials from each of his nominated roles in Cape Fear (1991), Awakenings (1990), Raging Bull (1980), The Deer Hunter (1978), Taxi Driver (1976), and The Godfather Part II (1974). De Niro won Oscars® for his leading role in Raging Bull and his supporting role in The Godfather Part II.

One of the costume ensembles worn by De Niro in Silver Linings Playbook is on display in the Ransom Center’s lobby, alongside his character’s television remote controls and Philadelphia Eagles handkerchief. Below, Assistant Curator of Costumes and Personal Effects Jill Morena writes about the importance of costumes and props to actors.

One of Robert De Niro's costume ensembles worn in 'Silver Linings Playbook.' Photo by Pete Smith.
One of Robert De Niro's costume ensembles worn in 'Silver Linings Playbook.' Photo by Pete Smith.

Costumes and props aid an actor to arrive at the mental and physical place of inhabiting and expressing the character he or she is portraying. They can also help illuminate the physical aspect and embodiment of performance.

In director David O. Russell’s Silver Linings Playbook, Robert De Niro plays Pat Solitano, Sr., a passionate Philadelphia Eagles fan who is struggling to reconnect with his troubled son, Pat Jr., and support his family with a bookmaking enterprise after losing his job. Costume designer Mark Bridges chose and modified clothing that would express Pat Sr.’s lifelong love of the Eagles. He imagined and selected clothing pieces that Pat Sr. would have worn and cherished through the years, such as this classic cardigan in the team color, green, to which Bridges added a patch representing a vintage Eagles logo.

The television remote controls are Pat Sr.’s game day talismans, which he deploys with anxious precision. They must be arranged in particular configurations or held by certain “lucky” persons, with the belief that the Eagles will prevail if these actions are followed. The Eagles handkerchief is held firmly by Pat Sr. throughout the game, or placed over the remote controls. Pat Jr. overtly expresses that Pat Sr. suffers from OCD and takes game day superstitions too far. The film implies that Pat Sr.’s obsessions may have been the genesis of Pat Jr.’s own mental health struggles.

Related content:
“Martin Scorsese” exhibition features items from Ransom Center.

R. Colin Tait, a PhD candidate and University Fellow at The University of Texas at Austin, has used the Robert De Niro collection as the basis for his dissertation, Robert De Niro’s Method: Acting, Authorship and Agency in the New Hollywood (1967–1980).

Senior Research Curator of Photography Discusses Photography in the Digital Age

Cover of The Getty Conservation Institute newsletter Conservation Perspectives.
Cover of The Getty Conservation Institute newsletter Conservation Perspectives.

In “Technology: No Place For Wimps,” Ransom Center Senior Research Curator of Photography Roy Flukinger joins Carol Henry, fine-art photographer, and James M. Reilly, founder and director of the Image Performance Institute at the Rochester Institute of Technology, in a discussion about photography in the digital age. The discussion, which appears in The Getty Conservation Institute newsletter Conservation Perspectives, features a question and answer session with the three experts and highlights the ways in which photographers, conservators, and curators respond to the challenges posed by a rapidly changing medium. Flukinger, Henry, and Reilly spoke with Dusan Stulik, a Getty Conservation Institute senior scientist, and Jeffrey Levin, editor of the Institute’s newsletter.

"Martin Scorsese" exhibition features items from Ransom Center

Makeup stills from "Raging Bull."
Makeup stills from "Raging Bull."

Martin Scorsese’s influential filmmaking legacy is the focus of a new exhibition, aptly titled Martin Scorsese, at the Deutsche Kinemathek—Museum für Film und Fernsehen in Berlin. The exhibition, which opened in January and runs through May 12, purports to examine “the rich spectrum of Scorsese’s oeuvre,” including his sources of inspiration, working methods, and lasting contributions to American cinema. The Ransom Center loaned 19 items from the Robert De Niro and Paul Schrader archives to supplement materials from Scorsese’s private collection. Together, they constitute the first international exhibition about Scorsese.

Martin Charles Scorsese grew up in New York’s Little Italy neighborhood in the 1950s, surrounded by a large Italian family and the high-pressure world faced by working-class immigrants. While life on the streets proceeded according to the rules of local gangsters, Scorsese’s asthma kept him largely confined to the house; he followed the outside world from his perch at the window. His older brother Frank recalls: “Marty had a tough childhood. But I used to keep him close. Take him to movies.”

The role of family, blood kin or otherwise, has been a central theme in Scorsese’s works, starting with the short films he made as a student. Throughout his career, he repeatedly cast family members as extras. Brotherly relationships are particularly prominent in Scorsese films, perhaps a product of growing up with tight bonds to his own brothers, or of the close partnerships he had with friends like Robert De Niro. For example, Scorsese’s 1980 film Raging Bull features brothers Jake La Motta (Robert De Niro) and Joey (Joe Pesci) as a New York boxer and his manager, respectively. Six Ransom Center items related to Raging Bull appear in the exhibition, including De Niro’s boxing gloves and trunks, and makeup test photographs with De Niro’s annotations.

Keychain used in "Cape Fear" by Robert De Niro. Photo by Pete Smith.
Keychain used in "Cape Fear" by Robert De Niro. Photo by Pete Smith.

Scorsese’s extensive knowledge of film history has undoubtedly reinforced his talents as a filmmaker. His 1991 remake of Cape Fear, originally a 1962 thriller directed by J. Lee Thompson, was met with positive critical reception, even inspiring a parody episode of The Simpsons. De Niro received Academy Award and Golden Globe nominations for Best Actor for his role in the film. Five items related to Cape Fear are featured at the Deutsche Kinemathek.

The exhibition pays tribute not only to Scorsese’s legacy as an American cinematic icon, but also to his commitment to the preservation of our international film heritage. The items on display are a testament to the enduring presence of film history as a referential guide for the ever-changing medium.

Photo Friday

Each Friday, the Ransom Center shares photos from throughout the week that highlight a range of activities and collection holdings. We hope you enjoy these photos that reveal some of the everyday happenings at the Center.

Ken Grant, Exhibition Conservator and Head of Exhibition Services, and John Wright, Chief Preparator, adjust lighting for the "Arnold Newman: Masterclass" exhibition, which opened on Tuesday. Photo by Edgar Walters.
Ken Grant, Exhibition Conservator and Head of Exhibition Services, and John Wright, Chief Preparator, adjust lighting for the "Arnold Newman: Masterclass" exhibition, which opened on Tuesday. Photo by Edgar Walters.
Lindsay Hutchens, shop manager at the Lomography Gallery Store, tests shots in the photo booth area before the “Face to Face” opening event. The Lomography Gallery Store will have an analog photo booth inspired by an Arnold Newman photograph set up at the event tonight. Photo by Alicia Dietrich.
Lindsay Hutchens, shop manager at the Lomography Gallery Store, tests shots in the photo booth area before the “Face to Face” opening event. The Lomography Gallery Store will have an analog photo booth inspired by an Arnold Newman photograph set up at the event tonight. Photo by Alicia Dietrich.
Project Archivist Savannah Gignac inventories personal effects from the Arnold Newman collection, including four pairs of his glasses and a stand he used for retouching photographs. Photo by Edgar Walters.
Project Archivist Savannah Gignac inventories personal effects from the Arnold Newman collection, including four pairs of his glasses and a stand he used for retouching photographs. Photo by Edgar Walters.

Frida Kahlo's "Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird" back on display today

Photo by Pete Smith.
Photo by Pete Smith.

Mexican artist Frida Kahlo’s Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird (1940), one of the Ransom Center’s most famous and frequently borrowed works of art, is on display through July 28.

Since 1990 the painting has been on almost continuous loan, featured in exhibitions in more than 25 museums in the United States and around the world in countries such as Australia, Canada, France, and Spain. View a map of where the painting has traveled in recent years.

The painting was most recently on view in the three-venue exhibition In Wonderland: The Surrealist Activities of Women Artists in Mexico and the United States, organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and exhibited subsequently at the Musée National des beaux-arts du Quebec in Quebec City and at the Museo de Arte Moderno in Mexico City. The painting travels next to The ARKEN Museum of Modern Art in Ishøj, Denmark, for the exhibition Frida Kahlo & Diego Rivera, running from September 7, 2013 to January 5, 2014.

Kahlo (1907–1954) taught herself to paint after she was severely injured in a bus accident at the age of 18. For Kahlo, painting became an act of cathartic ritual, and her symbolic images portray a cycle of pain, death, and rebirth.

Kahlo’s affair in New York City with Hungarian-born photographer Nickolas Muray (1892–1965), which ended in 1939, and her divorce from artist Diego Rivera at the end of that same year left her heartbroken and lonely. But she produced some of her most powerful and compelling paintings and self-portraits during this time.

Muray purchased the self-portrait from Kahlo to help her during a difficult financial period. It is part of the Ransom Center’s Nickolas Muray collection of more than 100 works of modern Mexican art, which was acquired by the Center in 1966. The collection also includes Kahlo’s Still Life with Parrot and Fruit (1951) and the drawing Diego y Yo (1930).

View the video documentary “A World of Interest: Frida Kahlo’s Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird,” which highlights the painting’s return to the Ransom Center.

Now open: “Arnold Newman: Masterclass”

Graphic identity for the exhibition "Arnold Newman: Masterclass."
Graphic identity for the exhibition "Arnold Newman: Masterclass."

The exhibition Arnold Newman: Masterclass opens today at the Harry Ransom Center and runs through May 12.

This exhibition explores the career of photographer Arnold Newman (1918–2006), who created iconic portraits of some of the most influential innovators, celebrities, and cultural figures of the twentieth century. Newman’s archive resides at the Ransom Center.

A bold modernist with a superb sense of compositional geometry, Newman is known for a crisp, spare style that situates his subjects in their personal surroundings rather than in a photographer’s studio. Marlene Dietrich, Harry Truman, John F. Kennedy, Arthur Miller, Salvador Dalí, and Pablo Picasso are only a few of his celebrated sitters. Featuring more than 200 of these well-known masterworks, Arnold Newman: Masterclass also includes rarely seen work prints and contact sheets.

The first major exhibition of the photographer’s work since his death, Arnold Newman: Masterclass showcases the entire range of Newman’s photography, featuring many prints for the first time.

Admission to the exhibition is free, but donations are welcome. Free docent-led tours of the exhibition are offered Tuesdays at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m.

The exhibition can be seen in the Ransom Center Galleries on Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays.

Become a member now to receive complimentary admission and valet parking at “Face to Face,” the opening celebration for the photography exhibition Arnold Newman: Masterclass. If you are not yet a member, you may purchase individual tickets for $20 (valet parking not included) at the door.

Frank Reaugh project reveals new details of the artist’s process

The Ransom Center is currently engaged in a one-year, grant-funded project to digitize, catalog, process and make the Frank Reaugh art collection available online, which will be the first complete collection of the Ransom Center’s new digital asset management system. The project is ongoing and is expected to be completed and available online to viewers by the fall.

The Frank Reaugh collection consists primarily of pastel landscapes on paper and board but also includes oil landscapes and portraits, charcoal sketches, and pen and ink drawings. Reaugh’s (1883–1937) favorite subject, the Texas Longhorn, is often featured within his untamed Texas landscapes. His work includes native subjects and locations ranging from the Texas Panhandle to the state’s western plains and mountainous regions and beyond the state border to New Mexico, Arizona, and Wyoming. Interest in Frank Reaugh has grown steadily over the years, as his contributions as an influential artist, arts educator, benefactor, naturalist, and inventor are being increasingly recognized by curators, collectors, and scholars. Access to the works has long been limited due to their delicate nature and to their sheer number and size.

Digitization of the framed and often fragile works is not simple. Many of the pastels have never before been removed from their original frames and mats, which were largely constructed by Reaugh himself. Thus far, the first half of the collection has been digitized, beginning with Reaugh’s distinctive small-format pastel landscapes. When the project is finished, researchers will not only have unprecedented access to the entire body of Reaugh’s work held by the Ransom Center but will also have the opportunity to peer beneath the frames.

During the process of removing these delicate pastels from their frames, there is often an unexpected surprise waiting beneath the window mat. Reaugh used his own technique to prepare the paper to hold the pastel media, and evidence of this applied fixative is easily visible in the margins of the paper support. A view of the margins of some of these pastels also reveals previously hidden inscriptions and areas where Reaugh tested his colors. One can see the well-delineated borders of his rectangular landscapes, which he sometimes stayed within, but more often allowed his strokes to extend beyond the intended space. Two pastels have even revealed outlined sketches on the reverse, offering insight into Reaugh’s preliminary drawing techniques. In addition to the works themselves, the framing materials and methods speak to Reaugh’s time on the cattle-trail, where it appears that he made use of whatever materials he had on hand.

Images of each artwork (including the fronts and backs, framed and unframed) will be available via the Ransom Center’s new digital asset management system in the fall. Funding for the Frank Reaugh project is made possible with support from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Please click on the thumbnails below to view full-size images.

Win tickets to "Face to Face" exhibition opening

Arnold Newman, "Marilyn Monroe and Carl Sandburg" (Detail), 1962. © Arnold Newman/Getty Images.
Arnold Newman, "Marilyn Monroe and Carl Sandburg" (Detail), 1962. © Arnold Newman/Getty Images.

The galleries are being transformed in preparation for the Ransom Center’s new photography exhibition Arnold Newman: Masterclass. We hope you will join us for “Face to Face,” the opening celebration for the exhibition from 7 to 9 p.m. on Friday, February 15.

Sip on refreshments from Austin Wine Merchant and Dripping Springs Vodka, pose in an Arnold Newman-inspired analog photo booth created by the Lomography Gallery Store, enjoy treats at The Cupcake Bar’s dessert station, and view screenings of Arnold Newman interviews and film clips.

Be among the first to explore photographer Arnold Newman’s iconic portraits of celebrities and cultural figures including John F. Kennedy, Salvador Dalí, Ansel Adams, and Pablo Picasso, among others. Newman’s archive resides at the Ransom Center.

Guests will have the opportunity to enter a drawing for a Newman-inspired prize package that includes brunch for two at Fonda San Miguel, a stay at the Heywood Hotel in East Austin, a darkroom class with photographer Anthony Maddaloni, a Lomography camera, a membership to Austin Center for Photography, and more.

Ransom Center members enjoy complimentary admission and valet parking at this event. If you are not yet a member, you may join or order individual $20 tickets at the door. Tickets are also available online until Friday, February 8. Valet parking is not included for non-members.

The Ransom Center is giving away a pair of tickets to “Face to Face.” Email hrcgiveaway@gmail.com with “Arnold Newman” in the subject line by midnight CST tonight to be entered in a drawing for complimentary admission for two. The winner will be notified by email on Monday, February 11.

Special thanks to these sponsors: Anthony Maddaloni Photography, Austin Center for Photography, Austin Wine Merchant, Dripping Springs Vodka, Fonda San Miguel, Heywood Hotel, Lomography Gallery Store, and Thames & Hudson.