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In the galleries: Anna Atkins’s “Peacock Feathers” and Anna Krachey’s “Filament”

By Abigail Cain

Anna Krachey, "Filament," 2012. Courtesy of artist.
Anna Krachey, "Filament," 2012. Courtesy of artist.
Anna Atkins, "Peacock Feathers."
Anna Atkins, "Peacock Feathers."

Although Anna Atkins and Anna Krachey share a first name, Krachey acknowledges a much deeper connection. A member of Austin-based artist collective Lakes Were Rivers, Krachey came across Atkins’s work in the Ransom Center’s collections. She noticed an exploration of light, layering, and space that was similar to her own photographic practice.

Such connections form the basis of the Ransom Center’s current exhibition, Contemporary Photographic Practice and the Archive. Created in collaboration with Lakes Were Rivers, the exhibition highlights members’ works that were influenced in some way by the Ransom Center. Approximately 50 new works are displayed alongside Ransom Center collection materials chosen by the artists. The pairings illustrate how archives and cultural collections stimulate new ideas and creative acts.

Atkins, born in 1799 in England, was an amateur botanist. She is known primarily for her thousands of cyanotypes, which often featured marine botanicals and other plants and objects. Peacock Feathers offers an example of the camera-less photographic technique—one that provided a new way of recording scientific specimens, different from the traditional letterpress method.

Krachey recognizes a similarity between Atkins’s choice of subject and her own process of identifying and selecting objects for photographs. She aims to reveal the unfamiliar in everyday objects by creating tension between the natural and the artificial. In her work Filament (2012), she plays with tactility, translucency, and composition, using analog rather than digital photographic methods to manipulate objects and create illusionistic space.

Both Filament and Peacock Feathers are on display through August 4. On this Thursday, July 18, the artists of Lakes Were Rivers will discuss their work at 7 p.m. in the galleries.

In the galleries: Jason Reed’s "Motel, Terlingua" and W. D. Smithers’s "View of Study Butte, Texas"

By Abigail Cain

Jason Reed, "Motel, Terlingua," 2011. Courtesy of artist.
Jason Reed, "Motel, Terlingua," 2011. Courtesy of artist.
W.D. Smithers, "View of Study Butte, Texas," 1932.
W.D. Smithers, "View of Study Butte, Texas," 1932.

As photographer Jason Reed sat in the reading room of the Ransom Center, awaiting a box of Walker Evans photographs, he noticed a binder on the reference shelf nearby. In what he calls a “moment of coincidence,” he picked it up and discovered notes and captions describing photographs of West Texas—both the place he grew up and the area he has spent his life exploring through video and photography.

The binder contained a finding aid to the work of early-twentieth-century photographer W. D. Smithers, whose archive is held by the Ransom Center. Although 80 years separate the two artists, their work shares an uncanny similarity—take Reed’s Motel, Terlingua (2011) and Smithers’s View of Study Butte, Texas (1932) as an example.

The relationship between archives and the work of modern-day artists is the subject of the Ransom Center’s current exhibition Contemporary Photographic Practice and the Archive. Created in conjunction with the Lakes Were Rivers collective, an Austin-based group of artists working in photography and video, the exhibition highlights members’ works that were influenced in some way by the Ransom Center. Approximately 50 new works are displayed alongside Ransom Center collection materials chosen by the artists.

Smithers began his career in commercial photography when he was 15 years old, eventually working as an aerial photographer for the U.S. Army Aviation Service during World War I. Between 1935 and 1939, under a contract with the International Boundary and Water Commission, Smithers photographed the entire U.S.-Mexican Border from Brownsville to San Diego.

Reed, too, focuses on the interplay between culture and land in the Texas-Mexico borderland. By pairing his and Smithers’s works, he said, “I work to elicit historical comparison and dialogue with the past while also creating space to reflect on photography’s role as an index of place and time, its inherent limitations in telling histories, and the archive as a catalyst in forming new ways of seeing.”

Motel, Terlingua and View of Study Butte, Texas are on display in the Ransom Center until August 4. On July 18, the artists of Lakes Were Rivers will discuss their work at 7 p.m. in the galleries.

Photo Friday

By Edgar Walters

Each Friday, the Ransom Center shares photos from throughout the week that highlight a range of activities and collection holdings. We hope you enjoy these photos that reveal some of the everyday happenings at the Center.

Mark Updegrove, Director of the LBJ Presidential Library, reads at Wednesday's "Politics and Presidents" Poetry on the Plaza event. Photo by Pete Smith.
Mark Updegrove, Director of the LBJ Presidential Library, reads at Wednesday's "Politics and Presidents" Poetry on the Plaza event. Photo by Pete Smith.
Barry Stone of the artist collective Lakes Were Rivers conducts a show-and-tell with Ransom Center staff to prepare for an upcoming exhibition this summer at the Ransom Center. Photo by Alicia Dietrich.
Barry Stone of the artist collective Lakes Were Rivers conducts a show-and-tell with Ransom Center staff to prepare for an upcoming exhibition this summer at the Ransom Center. Photo by Alicia Dietrich.
Photographer Nathan Lyons signs copies of his books at the Ransom Center before speaking at a public program on Thursday. Photo by Pete Smith.
Photographer Nathan Lyons signs copies of his books at the Ransom Center before speaking at a public program on Thursday. Photo by Pete Smith.

Old Inspires the New

By Jennifer Tisdale

Austin-based Lakes Were Rivers, a group of 11 artists working in photography and video, recently collaborated with the Ransom Center to pair works of its artists with images from the Center’s photography collection, resulting in (Re)Collection, an exhibition in conjunction with the East Austin Studio Tour.

Each artist selected an image from the Ransom’s Center photography collections to be scanned and printed as an 8×10 reproduction. In the exhibition, these collection images are paired with a representative work made by members of Lakes Were Rivers, generating a complex and varied dialogue about the traditions and potential of photography as a medium.

Re(Collection) is on view this Saturday and Sunday, November 19 and 20, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 1319 Rosewood Avenue. Members of Lakes Were Rivers will serve as gallery attendants and will be available to discuss the show with visitors.

Some of the pairings appear below.

Adam Schreiber. Rirkrit Tiravanija, Untitled, 1999. Archival inkjet print. 2011.
Adam Schreiber. Rirkrit Tiravanija, Untitled, 1999. Archival inkjet print. 2011.
Paul Louis Marie Fabre-Domergue. Octopus Vulgaris, 1899. La photographique des animaux aquatques. Harry Ransom Center.
Paul Louis Marie Fabre-Domergue. Octopus Vulgaris, 1899. La photographique des animaux aquatques. Harry Ransom Center.

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Ben Ruggiero. Windows as Viewed #71: Migrant Mother, Dorothea Lange 1936. Window etching cyanotype contact print. Harry Ransom Center. November 11, 2011.
Ben Ruggiero. Windows as Viewed #71: Migrant Mother, Dorothea Lange 1936. Window etching cyanotype contact print. Harry Ransom Center. November 11, 2011.
Dorothea Lange. Destitute peapickers in California; a 32 year old mother of seven children. February 1936. Harry Ransom Center.
Dorothea Lange. Destitute peapickers in California; a 32 year old mother of seven children. February 1936. Harry Ransom Center.

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Jessica Mallios. Motif. Archival inkjet print. 2011.
Jessica Mallios. Motif. Archival inkjet print. 2011.
Philip H. Delamotte. Colossal head of Bavaria. Photographic Views of the Progress of the Crystal Palace, Sydenham. London: Crystal Palace Company, 1855. Harry Ransom Center.
Philip H. Delamotte. Colossal head of Bavaria. Photographic Views of the Progress of the Crystal Palace, Sydenham. London: Crystal Palace Company, 1855. Harry Ransom Center.

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Mike Osborne. Wendover, Utah. Archival inkjet print. 2011.
Mike Osborne. Wendover, Utah. Archival inkjet print. 2011.
Francis Frith. The Pyramids of Dahshoor
Lower Egypt, Thebes, and the Pyramids
1862 (ca.). Harry Ransom Center.
Francis Frith. The Pyramids of Dahshoor
Lower Egypt, Thebes, and the Pyramids
1862 (ca.). Harry Ransom Center.